November 5

Under Britain’s Toleration Act of 1649, which also applied to all her colonies, officials of neither the State nor the Church could prosecute Baptists for merely preaching the gospel. But our Baptist brethren in Virginia were so hated that the State trumped up other kinds of charges in order to silence them. For example, the Order Book of Orange County, Virginia, for July 28, 1768, states that John Corbley, Allen Wiley, Elijah Craig and Thomas Chambers were found guilty of a Breach of Good Behaviour and were ordered into Bond. The document said that they were charged as “Vagrant and Itinerant Persons” who “assembled themselves unlawfully at Sundry Times and Places under the Denomination of Anabaptists for Teaching and Preaching Schismatick Doctrines.” They were accused of being vagrants. Despite being arrested on several occasions they consistently went back to their preaching ministries. John Corbley was one of those pioneer Baptists in Virginia who struggled against religious persecution. His trials were many and varied, including the slaughter of his wife and family by Indians, but he continued faithful to the end. On this day (November 5) in 1775, at the age of 42, he constituted a Baptist Church at Forks-of-Cheat in West Virginia with 12...

July 9

Brother and Mrs. George Hough felt that the Lord was calling them to minister in His name in India with Adoniram Judson, but, like the Judsons, they ended up in Burma. When they began to tell their friends and relatives about the Lord’s call, some were delighted, but not Mrs. Hough’s family.  They knew that it was likely they’d never see their daughter again.  To answer her mother’s broken heart, Mrs. Hough wrote some lovely and passionate letters.  She explained God’s call and the joy that filled her heart and that of her husband.  She pointed to her mother’s desire for the salvation of her children, reminding her that foreign mother’s should have the same desire.  “Why should not I go to India (Burma) as well as other women, and share with my husband the trials and comforts of a life devoted to the cause of truth?  I hope you and all other Christians will pray for us, that we faint not in the day of trial.”     The trials came and Brother Hough suffered along side Brother Judson.  He too was jailed, while his wife prayed for his safety and delivery.  Both Brother and Mrs. Hough suffered with disease and poverty.  And for a long time they saw little fruit for their service.  Eventually, on this day (July 9) in 1859, the Lord called Missionary Hough home.  His wife was, of course, grieved, but she was not dissatisfied with their choice to leave the pleasures of home and to serve the Lord in Burma.  She continue in Burma, ministering to the women and children of that...

Old Age

This message was delivered by Pastor Ken Carter who was visiting from the Anchorage Sovereign Grace Baptist Church.  We don’t have a print copy of the message, but it should be available through our audio...

May 22

Joseph Ivimey was born on this day, 1773, in Ringwood, England. He was taught the trade of a tailor by his father, but he was taught little else, either secular or religious. While still in his youth he was sent to work for his uncle, and for the first time in his life he heard the gospel. He wanted more, so he would often walk nine miles with two friends to Wimbourne for that privilege, eventually being converted to Christ. In 1794 Joseph moved to Portsea and became a member of the Baptist church of that city. There with the need of the gospel in area villages, he was encouraged to give his testimony and to preach, but contrary to the opinions of others, he didn’t think that he was very skilled. Proof of his ability came in the form of a call to the Baptist church at Eagle Street, London. Eventually he accepted and was ordained on January 16, 1805. He spent the rest of his life at Eagle Street, but his ministry was not confined to London. Not only did he encourage and help many young men to enter the ministry, he authored the four-volume “History of the English Baptists” which is considered by many as the finest of its kind. Joseph Ivimey preached his last message on December 8, 1833 from the text “I know Whom I have believed, and am persuaded that He is able to keep that which I have committed unto Him against that day.” Soon afterward he prepared his will, demanding that two words be inscribed on his burial stone. On a...

February 14

There is quite a bit of evidence for the very ancient history of the Baptists in Wales. There are some who believe that the first Baptist church in that country was started by Paul himself, but whether or not that is true, Baptistic people were there long before the development of Roman Catholicism. On August 23, 1711, the (Baptist) church in Blaenaugwent, Wales held a special service for their pastor who was soon to leave them. He had been there for more than fifteen years, but he was leaving because he felt that the Holy Spirit was sending him to America. His last message to the church in Wales was transcribed and we have it today. Pastor Abel Morgan and his family traveled to Bristol, and on September 28 they sailed for America. Traveling in the late fall and winter on the North Atlantic is always dangerous, and the tiny ship was driven back to England for three weeks. Again they tried, but they made it only as far as Cork, Ireland, where they waited an additional five weeks. On November 19, they were finally able to set sail. Then on December 14 the Morgan’s son died, and three days later his mother followed. Both were buried at sea. Without a doubt, Pastor Morgan, was tried and greatly grieved, but with complete confidence in the sovereign God, he persevered without complaint. Finally on this day (February 14) in 1712, Abel Morgan arrived in American and soon took up his work in Penepeck near Philadelphia, and he labored there until his death ten years later. Among Baptist sir names, Morgan has...

Winds and Windows (#69) – Malachi 3:10

The Winds of the Word of God: What controls the wind (atmospheric pressure systems; the prayers of the saints; the prince of the power of the air; Jehovah)? Not prayer, at least not directly What caused the wind which nearly sank the disciple’s little boat on the Sea of Tiberias (the sins of those saints, Jehovah; Satan; clashing atmospheric pressure systems)? The Lord??? Satan??? John 6:1 “Who hath ascended up into _______________, or ________________? who hath _________________ the wind in his _______________? who hath _________________ the waters in a _________________? who hath established all the __________________ of the earth? what is his _______________________, and what is his _____________________ name, if thou canst tell?” Pr 30:4 Who caused a fierce wind to immediately cease by nothing more than his verbal command (Jonathan; Jehovah; Jesus; Jerubbaal)? Christ Jesus Who held the four winds of the earth so that they would not blow (Satan; Baal; four of Jehovah’s angels; Jesus)? Angels – Rev. 7:1 What did the wind have to do with Noah’s flood (it pushed around the flotsam and jetsam; it toppled the rafts of the wicked; it pushed the birds into the water; it dried the land)? Dried – Gen 8:1 What did the east wind in Pharaoh’s dream do to the seven ears of corn; it (blasted them; pollinated them; toppled them; harvested them)? Blasted – Gen. 41:6 One of the disasters which befell Egypt in the days of Moses was a wind which carried with it (the plague; hail; fox tails; locusts). Ex. 10:13 – the east wind brought the locusts What reversed that disaster (Moses’ faith; Egypt’s...

January 17

As far as recorded history is concerned, we first hear of George Blaurock in a debate about infant “baptism.” It occurred in Switzerland on this day (January 17), 1525. Brother Blaurock had been a Roman Catholic monk, but through Bible study, the Holy Spirit had brought him to understand the truth about faith in Christ. Among other things, he considered infant baptism to be an attack on the liberty of the soul. As another Anabaptist of the day put it, “By infant baptism men coerce others to enter the Kingdom of God; and yet there should be no coercion there.” Hans Denck wrote: “Let everyone know that in matters of faith, things ought to be on a voluntary basis, without coercion.” His public repudiation of infant baptism led to the imprisonment of Blaurock and several others, including Conrad Gerebel and Felix Manz. Eventually Brother Blaurock was burned at the stake in Claussen, The charges were that “he had forsaken his office as priest, which he had formerly exercised in the popery; that he disregarded infant baptism and taught people a new baptism; that he rejected the Mass; that he likewise rejected the confession of the priests … and that the mother of Christ is not to be invoked or worshiped.” Pastor Blaurock possessed the gift of poetry. One of his hymns says: “As He himself our sufferings bore When hanging on the accursed tree So there is suffering still in store O pious heart, for you and...

January 17

  As far as recorded history is concerned, we first hear of George Blaurock in a debate about infant “baptism.” It occurred in Switzerland on this day (January 17), 1525. Brother Blaurock had been a Roman Catholic monk, but through Bible study, the Holy Spirit had brought him to understand the truth about faith in Christ. Among other things, he considered infant baptism to be an attack on the liberty of the soul. As another Anabaptist of the day put it, “By infant baptism men coerce others to enter the Kingdom of God; and yet there should be no coercion there.” Hans Denck wrote: “Let everyone know that in matters of faith, things ought to be on a voluntary basis, without coercion.” His public repudiation of infant baptism led to the imprisonment of Blaurock and several others, including Conrad Gerebel and Felix Manz. Eventually Brother Blaurock was burned at the stake in Claussen, The charges were that “he had forsaken his office as priest, which he had formerly exercised in the popery; that he disregarded infant baptism and taught people a new baptism; that he rejected the Mass; that he likewise rejected the confession of the priests … and that the mother of Christ is not to be invoked or worshiped.” Pastor Blaurock possessed the gift of poetry. One of his hymns says: “As He himself our sufferings bore When hanging on the accursed tree So there is suffering still in store O pious heart, for you and...

A Serious Look at Bible Wells and Widows (#68) – Isaiah 12:1-6

Biblical Wells: In the Bible the word “well” might be a (noun; adjective; adverb; ellipsis)? Not ellipsis or pause In which of the following is “well” used as a noun (Gen. 21:19; Prov. 30:29; Gen. 29:17)? Gen 21:19 In which of the following is “well” used as an adverb (John 4:6; James 2:8; Gen. 41:2)? James 2:8 In which of the following is “well” used as an adjective (Eph. 6:3; I Sam. 16:17; Col. 3:20)? Col. 3:20??? In which of the following is “well” used as an allegory (Isa. 12:3; II Pet. 2:17; John 4:14)? All of these In the Bible a well might be (a cistern; a pit; a fountain; a spring)? Any of these What is the most common Hebrew word which is translated “well” (beer; bor; magor; major)? Beer-sheba Whose teary eyes were opened by God in order to see a well of water (Jeremiah; Melchizedek; Hagar; Shamgar)? Hagar – Gen. 21:19 Earlier this person was met by God at (the cross; the crossroads; a fountain of water; in the wilderness on the way to Shur). Gen. 16:7-8 – fountain in Shur Who quarreled with Abimelech over a well of water (Noah; Abraham; Jacob; Isaac)? Abra – Gen. 21:25 Where were these two when they established a covenant of peace (Hebron; Jerusalem; Beersheba; Versailles)? “The well of Sheba” – Gen. 21:32 Generally speaking where was that place (in the heart of Philistia; in the south; east of the Dead Sea; outside of Jerusalem)? South – “from Dan to Beersheba” – Israel from north to south Did this treaty last very long (yes; no; I don’t know;...

God’s People ought to be Disciples – John 15:1-8

Shakespeare’s play “Romeo and Juliet,” centers on two young people – one each from feuding families. At one point Juliet muses that Romeo’s last name doesn’t make him any less a wonderful person. She says, “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” The meaning is that the names of things do not affect what they really are. While it is true that “Montague” is neither good or evil in itself, any more than “Capulet” – it is also true that many times a name or a title describes exactly the sort of person who carries it. While a “Republican” may be either a liberal or a conservative, a “Christian” ought to thoroughly honor Christ, according to the narrow confines of the Word of God. There are no wide-ranging liberal and conservative Christians Tonight I intend, the Lord willing, to begin a series of messages looking at titles which have been applied to God’s people. We will start with those which we find in the Bible, but eventually we will move into historical names. My intention is three fold – the first is simply educational. But my second goal is to show that quite often we fall short of what these titles convey. So my third point will be – here in this title is what we should strive to become for the glory of our Saviour. Tonight we will start with the term “disciple.” It might be argued there are better places to start. One might think we should begin by looking at the word “Christian” – but “Christian” is rather rare title in the Word...

A Serious Look at Biblical Weeping (#67) – Psalm 30:1-5

When we read the words “cry” and “crying” in the Bible the meaning is (weeping; lamenting; shouting; vociferation)? Any of these – vociferation = shouting Who is the first Biblical character to be described as weeping (Adam; Noah; Abraham; Hagar)? H – 21:16 Was this person’s weeping justified (no; yes, because someone died; yes, because it indicated repentance; yes, because it was a joyful response to a blessing from God)? Who is the second Biblical character to be described as weeping (Abraham; Sarah; Jacob; Esau)? 23:2 In this case, we learn that (weeping is sin; not even God’s saints can avoid grief; we should not sorrow even as others which have no hope; tears are a waste of time). Grief comes to allWhat caused Esau’s grief (sin; his mother’s death; his brother’s treachery; death)? Heb. 12:17 – Jacob What caused Jacob to weep (his mother’s death; his expulsion from home; his sin; finding the Lord’s will for a wife)? Rachel – Gen. 29:11 What caused Esau’s tears in Gen. 33 (repentance, Jacob’s treachery; Jacob’s return; the death of his father)? Jacob’s return Esau’s weeping spread to (Abraham; Sarah; Jacob; Rachel). Jacob – 33:4 Weeping may be caused by (sorrow; repentance; joy; Jehovah)? All of these Jacob’s next tears came upon news of (his brother’s wrath; his son’s sinfulness; Joseph’s death; Benjamin’s arrest)? He was told that Joseph had died – 37:35 For whom did Joseph weep (himself; his brothers; his father; Benjamin)? Not for himself For what did Israel weep in Exodus 2 (sin; bondage; freedom; a Saviour)? Freedom, bondage – Ex. 2:23 Who else wept in that chapter...

War and Weapons (#66) – Psalm 46:9

Biblical Wars and Battles: The first war, of which we read in the Bible, was at (Eden; Babel; the Jordan Valley; Armageddon)? Gen.14 Who was the protagonist in this war (Adam; Noah; Abraham; Lot)? Abraham The aggressors included (Amraphel; Arioch; Chedorlaomer; Gomer). Not Gomer The victims included (Bera; Bara; Shinab; Shemerber). Not Bara Collateral damage included (Abraham; Jacob; Lot; Laban). Lot What is the likelihood that this was humanity’s first war (likely; unlikely)? Highly unlikely The first time that Amalek fought Israel, the site was at (Sinai; Megiddo; Jericho; Rephidim). Ex. 17:8 – Rephi Who won that battle (Amalek; Joshua; Israel; Jehovah)? Amalek lost – 17:13 – Joshua discomfited Amal Was that the last time Amalek attempted an attack on Israel during the wilderness period (yes, no)? No What nation defeated Israel after her murmuring over the report of the twelve spies (Egypt; Canaan; Amalek; Philistia)? Num. 14:45 – Canaanites and Amalekites Does it make sense that a nation defeated less than forty years earlier could mount and win another war? Arad was a king of what nation (Amalek; Amon; the Amorites; Canaan)? Numb. 21:1 – Canaan Arad and his nation were defeated by (Joshua; Moses; Jehovah; Israel)? The Lord delivered them up With God’s power Israel defeated Sihon, who was king of the (Ammonites; Amorites; Amalekites; Canaanites). Amorites Who, despite Balaam’s help, was defeated by Israel – (the Philistines; the Midianites; the Amorites; the Ammonites)? Midian – Numb. 31 What was the first major city conquered by Israel in its taking of the Promised Land (Jerusalem; Ai; Jericho; Hebron)? Jericho Would you say that the battle was typical...

A Serious Look at Bible Vineyards and Vows (#65) – Ecclesiastes 5:4

Biblical Vineyards: What sort of plants can be grown in vineyards (clematis; wisteria; grapes; jasmine)? Technically, all of these In the Bible what is generally grown in a vineyard (vines; wheat; clematis; grapes)? Grapes The Hebrew word translated “vineyard” is also translated (grapes; vines; vintage; wine)? Vine & vintage A “vintage car” is one that is (purple in color; parked under a trellis; is old; is of high quality)? Old & quality The Greek word translated “vineyard” is also translated (old car; senior citizen; grape; field)? Only vineyard As far as we know who planted the first vineyard (Adam; Noah, Cain; Lamech)? Noah – Gen. 9:20 Did God approve of vineyards (yes; no)? Apparently because He applied some laws to them If a man’s herd broke into another’s vineyard and destroyed the crop, God ordered (the herd to be barbequed; five hundred shekels was to be paid in restitution; the best of the herd-owner’s vintage was to be given; the offending party was obligated to build better fences)? Ex. 22:5 – vintage given in restitution What was to be done to the vineyard every seventh year (chopped to the ground; nothing; burned: exchanged with the neighbor’s vineyard)? Nothing – Ex. 23:11 In harvesting the vineyard (a lack of care was encouraged; every grape was to be picked; every seventh grape was to be squished into the soil; the pickers were to be paid in grapes)? Lev. 19:10 – do not glean According to God’s law, strangers and the poor were permitted (live among the vines; glean whatever the harvesters had missed; pull vines and replant them in their yards;...

A Serious Look at Bible Vessels – II Timothy 2:21

As generally used, a “vessel” might be (a small predatory animal; a ship; a container; a pot). Not a weasel In the Bible a “vessel” might be (a religious vestment; a container; a ship; a utensil). Utensil, container, shp In the Bible vessels are used (commonly; religiously; allegorically; astronomically). Not astronomically To whom did Abraham give bread and a vessel of water and send out into the wilderness (Isaac; Lot; Hagar; Ishmael)? Gen. 21:14 – Hagar Who used her shoulder-vessel to give a stranger and his camels some water (Rachel; Rebekah; Rahab; Ruth)? Rebekah – Gen. 24 According to Ex. 7, it appears that the common Egyptian used pots made of (gold; pewter; wood; stone)? Who spoke about vessels of bulrushes (Noah; Moses; Moses’ mother; Isaiah)? Isa 18:2 The vessels used in the tabernacle were to be made of (gold; pewter; silver; shittim wood). Gold – Ex. 25 The vessels used in the courtyard of the tabernacle were to be made of (gold; silver; wood; brass). Ex. 27 At its consecration, all the vessels of the tabernacle were to be (sprinkled with blood; singed with fire; anointed with oil; washed in lye). Anointed – Lev. 8:11 If the dead body of an unclean animal fell into one of the common vessels of Israel, that vessel was (to be given to the Goodwill; washed with lye; destroyed; purified in fire). Destroyed – Lev. 11:33 That law apparently applied only to vessels made of (stone; pewter; silver; wood). Wood In the ceremony of the cleansing of a leper, the blood of a sacrificial bird was to be collected in a vessel...

Types – Hebrews 8:1-5

When the pastor refers to something in the Bible as a “type,” he is (speaking Biblically; pontificating theologically; talking Greek; wasting my time). The word “type” is most often used in a theological sense The word is taken from (the printing industry; the Greek language; the Hebrew language; a really good thesaurus). “Type” comes from the Greek language “Type” is a transliteration of the Greek word (topos; tupos; tokos; tuphlos). Tupos – place – figure The word “tupos” is translated (figure; pattern; type; fashion)? All but “type” When the pastor refers to a Biblical “type,” he is (trying to confuse you; trying to show off; speaking in allegories; suggesting that one thing is a figure of something else)? The last two The subject and application of types (is Biblical; is subjective; is always authoritative; should be done with great care and sometimes a “little grain of salt”). Subjective and sometimes open to debate When something is declared in the Biblical to be a type (everything about that type matches its antecedent; it should be preached as absolute; one verse usually proves the point; it is money in the bank)? None In Acts 7, Stephen suggested that Remphan was (good for food; an idol; a figure of a god; a useful currency of exchange)? An idol god – Acts 7:43 Later he said that Moses built the tabernacle according to (the schematic drawings of Barzillai; the “tupos” given to him; the fashion that he had seen; materials at hand)? The tupos – the fashion – Acts 7:44 In Romans 5, Paul said that Adam was to Christ – (a forefather;...