Do we have a 1611 King James Bible Today?

“There have been thousands of revisions of the King James Bible!” “There have been four revisions of the King James Bible.” “There have been no revisions of the King James Bible!” “There have been 22,000 changes in the King James Bible since 1611.” “There have been 75,000 changes in the King James Bible since 1611.” “There have been 421 changes in the King James Bible since 1611.” “There haven’t been any changes in the King James Bible since 1611.” “I hold in my hands a 1611 King James Bible!” “You couldn’t read a 1611 King James Bible if you had one.” All of these statements have been made in connection with the modern debate over the King James Bible. All of them are made by people who are recognized as scholars by one group or another. How can such confusion exist about such a simple subject? Some of the confusion comes because people use the terms “edition,” “revision” and “translation” as if they were interchangeable. They are NOT! There are very real differences in the meanings of these words. A new edition refers to a literary work in a new form. The form may be new because of any number of external features. The correction of printing errors, changes in spelling, new footnotes, new marginal references, new parallel verse references, a new type size or font, a new cover or new pictures or maps create a new “edition” of the Bible. They do so without changing the words of the Scripture. A new revision of Scripture occurs when words are changed but only in a specific, limited fashion. Revisions...

An Examination of Baptismal Regeneration

By JOHN ZEWENIUK A booklet called “21st Century Disciples with a 1st Century Faith” by Waldo J. Werming is being used by a local Lutheran church to teach students the positions of Lutherans concerning doctrinal beliefs and practices. However, the Lutheran position concerning baptism in particular, as set forth in that booklet, and in various Lutheran confessions of faith is one that is in need of criticism on a scriptural and doctrinal basis. The following is a response and criticism of the section on baptism in the “21st Century Disciples with a 1st Century Faith” and therefore a criticism of the Lutheran position in general. The Lutheran position will be presented as it appears in various Lutheran confessions of faith and the booklet by Waldo J. Werming. The Independent Baptist position will be presented, and historical aspects of both beliefs will be discussed. Then specific problems in Werming’s article will be pointed out. Finally a discussion of the problems of the Lutheran position and its implications will be set forth in light of both the scriptural and historically Baptist doctrine. The following is written with the interests of scriptural truth in mind, not for advancing one denomination’s belief over another, but an attempt to give an understanding of the scriptural teaching of baptism. The Lutheran PositionPerhaps the best method of understanding the Lutheran position is to consider the Lutherans own confessions of faith. The Augsburg Confession A.D. 1530 Article IX. briefly discusses baptism, and says: “Art. IX – Of Baptism. Of Baptism they teach that it is necessary to salvation, and that by Baptism the grace of God is offered,...

Francis Wayland – Preacher/Economist

By Lawrence M. Vance, PhD.One of the nineteenth-century’s great but long-forgotten works of political economy was not written by a politician or an economist, but by a Baptist minister. Francis Wayland was born in New York City in March 1796 and died in Providence, Rhode Island, in September 1865. He was an author, a preacher, a teacher, a pastor, and an administrator. (We have links to several of his works on our website.) Although Wayland was the son of a Baptist minister of the same name, he studied medicine after his graduation at a young age from Union College until his religious conversion and call to the ministry. He underwent another conversion as well. When he was in medical school, “a remarkable change” took place in his “intellectual condition.” Although he was “very desirous of knowledge” and “read everything” he could, he read only for amusement – “travels, novels, and works of humor.” He wondered “how persons could take so much pleasure in the didactic essays” and confessed that he was attracted to “no abstract thought of any kind” until “by accident” he commenced reading “something purely didactic” and found, to his surprise, that he “understood and really enjoyed it:” “The very essays, which I had formerly passed over without caring to read them, were now to me the gems of the whole book, vastly more attractive than the stories and narratives that I had formerly read with so much interest.” He then “awoke to the consciousness” that he was “a thinking being.” Wayland’s two conversion experiences altered forever the course of his life. After a brief period of...

President George Washington’s Letter to the United Baptist Churches in Virginia

Gentlemen: I request that you will accept my best acknowledgements for your congratulation on my appointment to the first office in the nation. The kind manner in which you mention my past conduct equally claims the expression of my gratitude. After we had, by the smiles of Heaven on our exertions, obtained the object for which we contended, I retired at the conclusion of the war, with an idea that my country would have no farther occasion for my services, and with the intention of never entering again into public life. But when the exigence of my country seemed to require me once more to engage in public affairs, an honest conviction of duty superseded my former resolution, and became my apology for deviating from the happy plan which I had adopted. If I could have entertained the slightest apprehension that the Constitution framed in the Convention, where I had the honor to preside, might possibly endanger the religious rights of any ecclesiastical society, certainly I would never have placed my signature to it; and if I could now conceive that the general government might ever be so administered as to render the liberty of conscience insecure, I beg you will be persuaded that no one would be more zealous than myself to establish effectual barriers against the horrors of spiritual tyranny, and every species of religious persecution. For you, doubtless, remember that I have often expressed my sentiment, that every man, conducting himself as a good citizen, and being accountable to God alone for his religious opinions, ought to be protected in worshipping the Deity according to the...

The Gospel Its Own Witness

THE GOSPEL ITS OWN WITNESS; OR, THE HOLY NATURE AND DIVINE HARMONY OF THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION CONTRASTED WITH THE IMMORALITY AND ABSURDITY OF DEISM by Andrew Fuller Laying his hand on the Bible, he would say, “There is true philosophy. This is the wisdom that speaks to the heart. A bad life is the only grand objection to this Book.” – EARL OF ROCHESTER. PREFACE. THE struggle between religion and irreligion has existed in the world in all ages; and if there be two opposite interests which divide its inhabitants, the kingdom of Satan and the kingdom of God, it is reasonable to expect that the contest will continue till one of them be exterminated. The peaceful nature of Christianity does not require that we should make peace with its adversaries, or cease to repel their attacks, or even that we should act merely on the defensive. On the contrary, we are required to make use of those weapons of the Divine warfare with which we are furnished, for the pulling down of strong holds, casting down imaginations, and every high thing that exalteth itself against the knowledge of God, and bringing into captivity every thought to the obedience of Christ. The opposition of the present age has not been confined to the less important points of Christianity, nor even to its first principles: Christianity itself is treated as imposture. The same things, it is true, have been advanced, and as frequently repelled, in former ages; but the adversaries of the gospel of late, encouraged it should seem by the temper of the times, have renewed the attack with redoubled vigour. One...

The History of the Waldenses

Taken from “An Exposition of the Book of Revelation” by Andrew Fuller The history of the witnesses prior to the eleventh and twelfth centuries is difficult to be traced, owing to the want of materials; and during those centuries almost all the accounts that we have of them are from the pens of their persecutors, who have not failed to transmit their memory to posterity in the most odious colours. That some who in church history are deemed heretics were really such need not to be questioned; but let any serious Christian read the church history of MOSHEIM; and, unless he can find a portion of true religion under the article of “heresies and heretics that disturbed the peace of the church during this century,” it is difficult to say where he is to look for it. After the utmost search through other parts, he may ask, “Where is wisdom, and where is the place of understanding?” There is little doubt but that all through these dark ages there were many thousands who stood aloof from the corruptions of the times, and bore practical testimony against them; and who, notwithstanding some errors, were much nearer the truth and true religion than those who have reproached them as heretics. There is reason to believe that amongst the Novatians, the Paulicians, the Cathari, the Paterines, and others who separated from the catholic church, and were cruelly persecuted by it, there were a great number of faithful witnesses for the truth in those days. We should not, like Bishop Newton, confine the witnesses to councils, princes, and eminent men, who in their...

A Missionary Dilemma

by Former Missionary to Alaska, Fred Nimmo  PREFACEThis paper is written at the request of many pastors, friends, and missionaries. It is not meant to be a complete work covering all mission fields. It is, however, my observations from several years in Alaska, and it does not necessarily reflect other mission fields. I am not criticizing because I have made most of these mistakes myself and have learned by experience. However, after talking with other missionaries and pastors, and consulting many books, I find that some of the same problems are true in other areas as well. Fred Nimmo, June 1975 PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITIONThis essay was written 15 years ago. Some of the examples have changed a bit. A few are still serving God; some have fallen by the wayside; some are in heaven; and a few unknown. The status of the two indigenous churches is still the same, as far as I know. However, the principles of this work are unchangeable. It is still the eternal Word of God. I have interviewed only three men for service on a two man team. When the cost was counted they backed out. Regrettably, there is still no one in sight, and we keep on with an inadequate system of trying to reach the world. Does anyone know how many have died in the last 15 years? and still so little has been done! My heart aches because of this knowledge. Again I say, “Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he will send forth labourers into his harvest.” – meaning raising up two man teams for...

The Translators To The Reader

Some modern copies of the King James Bible contain the Preface to the original 1611 edition. However I have heard from many that the vocabulary and sentence structure so common 400 years ago causes a lot of readers today to give up and not finish this valuable piece of English and religious literature. I have endeavored to “translate” and to a small degree edit that portion of the preface which is called “The Translators to the Reader.” There is an earlier, small portion of the Preface which is a dedication to King James, who was the patron and who financed the work, but I have omitted that. I’m sure that I could be criticized for this work of editing, but I assure you that this is an adequate rendition of the writer’s original intent. You will also find reason to criticize some of the things contained in this preface: things such as the praise given to King James, Augustine, Jerome and others, who were heretics in many ways. And there are also hints at some common false doctrines, such as the Universal or Catholic Church. But our point in this is to bring you the blessings of the original document, even if it has a few flaws. The Translators To The ReaderZeal to promote the common good, whether it be by doing any thing our selves, or by revising that which has been done by others, certainly deserves much respect and esteem, and yet it has received a cold reception. It is welcomed with suspicion instead of love, and with jealousy instead of thanks: and if there be any...