Proverbs of Solomon – Proverbs 25:1-7

  There are at least three divisions in the Book of Proverbs. The first nine chapters are written in paragraph form and contain a lot of figurative material. Proverbs 9 – “Wisdom hath builded her house, she hath hewn out her seven pillars: She hath killed her beasts; she hath mingled her wine; she hath also furnished her table. She hath sent forth her maidens: she crieth upon the highest places of the city, Whoso is simple, let him turn in hither.” This “wisdom” refers to the Lord in one fashion or another. Then in chapter 10 we begin to see the pithy statements of the the Holy Spirit. “The proverbs of Solomon. A wise son maketh a glad father: but a foolish son is the heaviness of his mother. Treasures of wickedness profit nothing: but righteousness delivereth from death. The LORD will not suffer the soul of the righteous to famish: but he casteth away the substance of the wicked.” When chapter 25 begins the Spiritual editor of this book tells us that Solomon’s proverbs were gathered in a different way. “These are ALSO proverbs of Solomon, which the men of Hezekiah king of Judah copied out.” “Copied out” is a Hebrew word most often translated “removed.” These proverbs were “removed” or if you like “transcribed” from the documents of Solomon’s court. These were things which the king said while dealing with the daily matters of state. Some people are gifted at speaking in this pithy, memorable sort of way, and Solomon was one of them. He didn’t pick and choose them for inclusion here, but rather some...

As a Roaring Lion – I Peter 5:6-11

  Have you seen or experienced any Satanic attacks lately? I believe you probably have whether or not you recognized them. That isn’t to say you actually saw Satan or even a demon, but you have been affected by them. And Satan himself is probably so busy that he really doesn’t directly come to tempt or trouble any of us. But he has his minions – his demons. In fact there may be one or two assigned to each of us, or at least to groups of us, like our church. And it isn’t that Satan doesn’t use his other allies – like the world or our own flesh to besiege us. But he is just as diligent today in attacking the Kingdom and people of God as he has ever been. Are you sure that when Brother Silver’s trailer was burglarized and the sound equipment for the Spokane evangelistic meetings was stolen that was not a Satanic attempt to disrupt or discourage those meetings? How can you explain that Sunday morning depression that struck you a few weeks ago, when there wasn’t any real cause for it? Have there been any recent attacks on our church membership or our doctrines? Have we had any visitors who showed interest for a while but then simply disappeared? Can you say for sure it wasn’t Satan who encouraged those people to walk away? If we stopped and asked the Lord to open our eyes, we might see an army of Satanic servants surrounding us and looking for an opportunity to disrupt our service of God. “Put on the whole armour of...

Ugly Unbelief – Matthew 13:53-58

  Let’s go back to last week’s lesson before moving on. While the Lord Jesus was at the top of Mt. Hermon being transfigured before Peter, James and John, the rest of the disciples were down below in the valley struggling to help some people in need. This is described in all three of the Synoptic Gospels – Matthew, Mark and Luke. A man had brought his demon-possessed son to the disciples seeking their help, but they couldn’t. When Christ, freshly off the mount, was approached with the problem, He mildly rebuked everyone, and then STERNLY rebuked the demon. That evil spirit instantly left the child, and the boy was back in his right mind. “Then came the disciples to Jesus apart, and said, Why could not we cast him out? And Jesus said unto them, Because of your UNBELIEF: for verily I say unto you, If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible unto you.” There are several important lessons here. One involves the relationship between the disciples and the glorified Saviour. Christ’s transfiguration was a temporary metamorphosis into the glory which was His from before creation. It is also the glory which He enjoys today – the glory to which He returned after His ascension. Today, He is on the holy mount, while we are here in the Spokane valley trying to do His will and to represent His name. And like the those early disciples, we are impotent without the blessing and power of...

September 1

I use three primary sources for these vignettes, consulting with others for corroboration and background. For September 1, two of my books referred to the death of Sarah Boardman Judson. Sarah (nee Hall) was born in 1803. The Lord saved her soul, and she became a member of the First Baptist Church in Salem, Massachusetts. There she became intensely interested in the salvation of others and particularly in missionary work. “How can I be so inactive, when I know that thousands are perishing in this land of grace; and millions in other lands are at this moment kneeling before senseless idols!” At the age of 22, Sarah met George Boardman, and their mutual interest in missions led them to marry on July 3, 1825. Thirteen days later they set sail for Burma. Together they accomplished a great work among the Karen people of the mountains of Burma – but the ministry of George Boardman was short. He was cut off by disease after only six years on the field. Sarah returned from the mountains to serve in the lowlands with the missionary team of Adoniram Judson. Judson who had been widowed several years earlier, fell in love with Sarah, and on April 10, 1834 they were married. Sarah was once again the perfect helpmeet for one of God’s missionaries. She was particularly skilled at languages, helping to translate the New Testament into the Peguan language and “Pilgrim’s Progress” into Burmese. After the birth of her last child in 1844, she became ill. When it was decided that a long sea voyage was needed, Brother Judson agreed to his first...

Proverbs of Solomon – Proverbs 24:27-34

  We have already touched on each of the themes in this last third of chapter 24, with one exception. “Prepare thy work without, and make it fit for thyself in the field; and afterwards build thine house.” There is some really sound advice in verse 27, which would save our grandchildren a great deal of grief if they would put it into practice. It is primarily practical, but I can see a spiritual application as well. Even though you may already understand it fully, let’s remind ourselves of what it says. Scattered all over North Idaho are companies which build log homes. I suppose they are all over the country – in places where there are sufficient trees for log construction. Most of these companies don’t contract to cut down trees on a man’s property, and then shape whatever they find into beams, joists and walls for some on-going design of a house. No, they cut specific trees, bringing them to their own location where they build the house. When their cabin fits the pre-designed plan, they mark and number the logs they have used. Then they disassemble that house and carry all those pieces to the homeowner’s property. There they prepare the foundation and then reassemble the building just as it was before. Some of us remember doing the same sort of thing as children with our sets of Lincoln Logs. In essence this is what the Holy Spirit is telling us to do. Out in your field, away from the beautiful site where you want your family home, prepare all the parts necessary for its construction....

July Report

Two New Visitors. July has been a very hot month with real temperatures soaring up to as high as I():’) degrees in the afternoons. The humidity is also very high and that makes the heat index even higher. Thank the Lord for air conditioning which makes it possible for a more comfortable living condition. Mr. Joe Ball, Desirae and family returned from their vacation in Tennessee and brought two new visitors with them to our Sunday morning service, July 14th, giving us 14 in attendance that day. They were Desirae’s daughter, Destiny, and Desirae’s mother, Linda. Linda returned with the family on the 21st of the month and now attends whenever the family attends. Our attendance fluctuates between about nine faithful people and visitors who come irregularly that raise the attendance number. We are praying that the Lord might bless the expository preaching of His glorious Word. We do not believe in resorting to entertainment of any kind to get people into our services, but do seek the lost through our outreach program, prayer, and expository preaching. Our Weekly Bulletin We now have a weekly bulletin.  Roxanne creates an attractive new front cover every week for the bulletin and we use it for listing prayer requests, pithy statements, our schedule of service, and our Sunday morning order of service.  It is a delight to use this medium to serve the Lord. By His grace and in loving gratitude, Tim and Roxanne Parrow....

August 25

Vermont has a unique Baptist history. It begins with the birth of Aaron Leland in Holliston, Massachusetts. He was born a second time and became a member of the Baptist church in Bellingham in 1785. Shortly after receiving a license by that church to preach the gospel, he received a letter from some people in Chester asking him to come and minister among them. The people were not Baptists, and when Leland arrived, he almost turned around to return home, but he relented and promised to stay a few weeks. Before he realized it, ten years had passed and a small church had been started. Then in 1799 the Lord began to abundantly bless. By the end of the revival the church was so large that the members decided to divide the congregation, starting churches in four different communities. None of my sources give the details, but while pastoring in Massachusetts, Leland became interested in Vermont, about fifty miles to the north, apparently doing evangelistic work there. Doors were opened which he couldn’t refuse to enter, and for nine years not only did missionary work, but he became a representative in the Vermont General Assembly. For five of those years he was Lieutenant Governor and for two of them the Governor was another Baptist, named Ezra Butler. Additionally, for nearly two decades Leland was one of the assistant justices of the county court. When in 1828 he was asked to run for governor, he declined saying that it would take too much time from the ministry. Once while he was Speaker of the House a proposition came up calling...

Proverbs of Solomon – Proverbs 24:23-26

  Many Bible principles are so plain and obvious they don’t need the spot-light of a lesson or sermon. But that might be only in the mind of the preacher – or perhaps in your mind. We sometimes forget there are younger Christians and children of Christians who don’t have the background the rest of us ought to have. Everyone needs to be instructed – even in the obvious – even if you have already had it burned it into your soul. The primary lesson of this scripture is so obvious and common that fear I won’t be able to keep your attention. So I am going to try to insert a tangent thought now and then in hopes of maintaining your interest. In fact, let’s start with one of those tangents. Despite what Solomon says, it is good to have respect for people. There are a number of Greek and Hebrew words translated “respect,” and there are a variety of meanings. Or maybe I should say, there are different DEGREES of respect. The word used here in Proverbs 24:23 begins with “discernment” – to look at someone attentively. When you meet someone for the first time, you look at him and begin immediately to form opinions. You like or don’t like the way he is dressed – the way he cuts or combs his hair – his facial expression. But how often has your first impression been wrong? You didn’t like his natty clothes and you judged that he could never be your friend. Or you looked at his smile and decided that he’s likely a good man,...

The Goal of the Christian – John 17:1-8

  I was reading a book the other day by a well-known, modern, Christian writer. It is always good to be alert when you read the works of others – read with “your eyes open.” This is especially true when you read the works of “well-known, modern, Christian writers.” There are many classic Christian books which have passed the test of time. They have been read by saints for decades, even centuries, and they have been approved by many. That is why they are still being read today. While we still read them with our eyes open, we might read them without fear. But the “well-known, MODERN, Christian writers” haven’t endured that test of time through the hearts and minds of other saints, so we must approach their work more carefully.   I was reading a recent book on Christian living when I came to chapter 21 entitled “The Goal of the Christian.” The author began by asking, “What is the goal of the Christian life?” After a few comments, he said that the goal of the Christian must be to bring glory to God our Saviour. Immediately, my heart said, “Amen.” That agrees with dozens of crystal clear scriptures. Still in the first paragraph the man wrote, “One bumper sticker that always catches my attention is the one that says, ‘Don’t follow me, I’m lost.’” He went on, “Because many Christians have no clear goal in view, it is impossible for them to accomplish anything in the Christian life. Because we are so vague in our thinking about what constitutes Christian living, we have to confess that we...

August 18

On this day in 1846, General Samuel Kearny took possession of New Mexico in the name of the United States of America. Soon after he raised the flag over Santa Fe, two Baptist missionaries, H.W. Read and Samuel Gorman, entered the new territory in the name of Christ Jesus. They may have been the first of any missionaries in New Mexico other than Roman Catholic. Eleven years later, Bro. Read had the joy of leading Blas Chavez, a twenty-one-year old Spanish-speaking national, to the Lord. Soon after that Bro. Gorman baptized the young man. Under the leadership of the two missionaries, Bro. Chavez grew rapidly in the grace of God, training to become a minister of the gospel. When the War Between the States commenced, New Mexico was occupied by Confederate troops. The two missionaries, whose loyalties lay with the North, suspended their work and returned home, but the work of Christ continued through Bro. Chavez. While primarily ministering to Spanish-speaking inhabitants, he didn’t fail to preach to anyone who would listen, and several churches were started among various nationalities of people. It is said that Bro. Chavez was inexhaustible. Eventually he became known as “The Grand Old Man of the Baptist ministry” in New Mexico. After fifty years of service he was called home on February 20,...